Barcode World  is the leading provider of all kind of barcode solutions .A barcode is an optic machine-readable representation of data  the object to which it is fastened. Originally barcodes systematically {displayed|symbolized|showed} data by varying the widths and spacings of parallel lines, {and could|and may even|and might} be referred to as {geradlinig|thready|step-wise} or one-dimensional (1D). {Later on|Afterwards|After} two-dimensional (2D) codes were developed, using rectangles, spots, hexagons and other geometric patterns in two {sizes|measurements|proportions}, usually called barcodes although they do not use bars {as a result|consequently}. Barcodes

Barcode World  is the leading provider of all kind of barcode solutions .A barcode is an optic machine-readable representation of data {associated with|in relation to|concerning} the object to which it is fastened. Originally barcodes systematically {displayed|symbolized|showed} data by varying the widths and spacings of parallel lines, {and could|and may even|and might} be referred to as {geradlinig|thready|step-wise} or one-dimensional (1D). {Later on|Afterwards|After} two-dimensional (2D) codes were developed, using rectangles, spots, hexagons and other geometric patterns in two {sizes|measurements|proportions}, usually called barcodes although they do not use bars {as a result|consequently}. Barcodes {formerly were|at first were} scanned by special optic scanners called barcode {visitors|viewers}. Later applications software became available for devices that could read images, such as smartphones with {digital cameras|video cameras|cams}.

An early use of one {kind of|form of|sort of} barcode in an {professional} context was sponsored by the {Relationship|Connection|Affiliation} of American Railroads {back again|again} in the 1960s. {Created|Produced|Designed} by General Telephone and Electronics (GTE) and called KarTrak ACI (Automatic Car Identification), this scheme {included|engaged} {inserting|positioning} colored stripes in various combinations on {metal|metallic|material} plates which were {attached|mounted|fixed} to the sides of railroad rolling stock. Two plates were used every car, one on each side, with the {set up|agreement|layout} of the colored {lines|lashes|beating} encoding information such as ownership, {kind of|form of|sort of} equipment, and identification number. The plates were read by a trackside {scanning device|reader}, located for instance, at the {access} to a classification yard, {as the|even though the} car was moving past. The project was abandoned after about {10|five|eight} years because the system proved unreliable after {long lasting|long term} use.

Barcodes became commercially successful when they were used to {handle|systemize|mechanize} supermarket checkout systems, a task for which they may have become almost universal. Their use has spread to many other tasks that are generically referred to as {programmed|computerized} identification and data {catch|get|record} (AIDC). The very first scanning of the now ubiquitous Universal Product Code (UPC) barcode was on a pack of Wrigley Company gum in {06|Summer|August} 1974.

Other systems have made inroads in the AIDC market, {however the|nevertheless the} simplicity, universality and {inexpensive|affordable|low priced} of barcode solutions has limited the role of these some until technologies such as radio frequency {recognition|id|identity} (RFID) became available after 2000.